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ARTISTS PROOFS, PRINTS, ORIGINALS, OK so I'm lost!

Reproduced (and edited) from the old ArtPapa forum - long may it rest in peace!
If you have any information on prints, printing, marketing or any related topic please share it with us in this thread.

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Re: ARTISTS PROOFS, PRINTS, ORIGINALS, OK so I'm lost!

Postby Mike Sibley » Sat Nov 23, 2013 11:38 pm

#45 art-in-me-sia

This has been a wonderful thread...very informative. I would like to include one method of printing which was overlooked. This method dates from Renaissance Germany and remains popular to this day. It's the INTAGLIO print and are individually hand-pulled, from an ETCHING press. All the following are created from an etching press. INTAGLIO is the method whereby an artist creates an image on a copper, or zinc plate, by means of acid reduction, or by hand. The following are the methodology terms.

Dry Point: A stylus/pointed metal tool is used to work directly into the metal, thus creating crevices in the surface of the metal. The surface is then inked, wiped and printed. The drawback with this process is that one can only get a small number of prints, due to the burrs lining the grooves breaking off with each printing. The burrs are what hold the ink. Check out 16th century, Albrech Durer's editions. They are this process.

*Note, the small the hand pulled edition, the more valuable the prints.

Acid Method: There are different approaches to this method, such as an aqua tint, spit bite, soft ground, hard ground and more. The acid eats away the areas that the artist has deliberately left exposed to the surface, in order to reveal an image. After several acid treatments, the plate is ink, wiped and printed, thus creating editions.

Collagraph: This is the creation of an image on a surface which could be metal, cardboard or some sturdy surface, whereby a variety of textures (fabric, sand, coffee grounds, hardened glue and more) are attached to the surface of the plate. The plate is inked, wiped and printed.

Alla Poupe: This is the term whereby several colors will be applied and wiped in specific areas of the plate.

Monotype: THis unfortunately is just what it indicates,....ONE print. The technique involves the creation of an image on a plexiglass surface (or similar flexible surface), in various colors of inks. Paper is placed over the image and pressed with the means of an etching press, or hand pressed with barens.

As for the paper used, there is a huge variety to choose from and to the best of my knowledge, are purchased individually. Many have deckled edges. Some are smooth and some are textured. Handmade papers are wonderful too. THe following are some names of these papers.

Rives-BFK
Arches
German Weave
Magnani Pescia
Somerset
and more.

Lastly, whenever you are in a museum, as someone to show you their print collection. Most often they are thrilled at the prospect at showing you what's in their archives. This way, you get an up close and personal look at some master's handy work. One of my favorite is the contemporary artist named, Tapies, but many artists have tried their hand at the Intaglio method. BTW, Lithography is a relatively newer method, developed in the mid 1800's.

Susan

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#46 Mike Sibley

[quote]...is it possible to get a good, detailed A3 print from an A4 drawing or less£ If it is, at what dpi should it be scanned for black and white, and is it the same for colour? [quote]
Personally, I wouldn't entertain doing it. I once increased a drawing in size by 10% but I wouldn't want do more than that. From A4 to A3? Consider that every line you drew will be twice as thick, every deviation in a line will be twice as noticeable, the texture of you paper will be twice as coarse...

If you must then I suggest you scan at twice the resolution you require for the final print. If you need to print at 300ppi then scan at 600ppi. In Photoshop, double the size and halve the resolution. I've been doing this recently for my book where I needed to enlarge a portion of a drawing and it's been quite successful.

Scan in colour. Colour stores 32 bits of data per pixel and it will pick up subtle shading that greyscale 8-bit scanning may lose. You can convert the scan to greyscale at any later stage.
Mike Sibley
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Re: ARTISTS PROOFS, PRINTS, ORIGINALS, OK so I'm lost!

Postby Mike Sibley » Sat Nov 23, 2013 11:42 pm

#49 Supurcar

My question is more from a consumer point of view. I have a few "Lithos" from an artist in the Bay Area of CA. Everyone was calling them Lithos, I do not know what to call them after reading some of the early posts on this thread. Delgado was the artist and they feature prominent Bay Area sports figures and they are signed in pencil by the athletes as well as the artist. Any idea what these are classified as, they are numbered like 19/300 etc. Do these hold their value very well£

SC

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#50 Bullyluvver

Litho or 'Offset Litho' is more the 'traditional' way to print - and often seen by galleries as superior to Giclée. If your print has been signed by the athlete as well as the artist, then I would expect it to not only hold it's value but increase in value over the years. The numbering simply means that your print is one of a limited edition of 300 and you have number 19 of that edition. Hope this helps some.

Gail
www.bullmoonstudio.com

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#51 garypace

Hi, I'm from Canada and I talked to 6 or more publishers to see what they had to offer me. Mill Pond press is one of the better ones , I'm sending my work to them latter this year. They publish your work and sell it in over 2100 stores in Canada and the USA . after these prints are done ,they are sent to you to sign and number be for they go to market . Before signing on with a publisher its good to check them out first . I don't know if this is any help to anyone .

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#52 Mike Sibley

Supurcar: I have a few "Lithos" from an artist in the Bay Area of Ca. Everyone was calling them Lithos, I do not know what to call them after reading some of the early posts on this thread.

Almost certainly an "Offset-litho" print.

The description "litho" is overused to the point where true lithos are missing out on their uniqueness.

A LITHO is a lithographic print - literally from "stone drawing" in Greek. The artist draws on a smooth stone surface, usually limestone, with wax-based crayons. When the stone is inked, using a variety of colours, the wax resists the ink and the resulting "print" can be classed as an "original", since so other original painting exists. Each impression is different from the last and edition numbers are typically very low.

An OFFSET-LITHO (more correctly, "Offset-Lithography") is a print produced from plastic or metal photographic plates taken from an original drawing or painting. The term "offset" refers to the ink from the plate being transferred to a rubber blanket, and then from the rubber blanket to paper. There are usually four plates (the CYMK system) that each control the inks for Cyan, Yellow, Magenta and Black. When I print graphite drawings, I use the Duotone process that uses two of the four plates and they are inked with Black and a warm grey. If you look closely at an offset-litho you should be able to detect a small dot pattern - similar to newsprint but much finer.

A quality Atelier, printing with OFFSET-LITHO, may work on the plates manually - acid used to burn and darken selected areas of some of the plates. Others are lightened, and many plates may be used along with a wide selection of hand-selected colours - all designed to faithfully match the colouring of the original.
Mike Sibley
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Re: ARTISTS PROOFS, PRINTS, ORIGINALS, OK so I'm lost!

Postby Mike Sibley » Sat Nov 23, 2013 11:44 pm

#53 conty

Can I ask a question that's been bothering me please? When your Image has been scanned for ltd editions but the original is say A4 is it acceptable to do a limited edition print of the original in a larger A3 ?

http://www.conorfarr.co.uk/

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#54 Mike Sibley

I see no reason why you shouldn't as long as the result is acceptable to YOU. It depends on how much you value your own work and reputation. Personally, I wouldn't want to enlarge anything because doubling the size is going to double any inaccuracies and the thickness of every line and mark. In other words, it's likely to make your original appear to be much coarser than it is in reality. I did once push an image up in size by 10% and it held up well, but I wouldn't do that again - and certainly not to 100%.
Mike Sibley
Website: www.SibleyFineArt.com
Book: Drawing from Line to Life
Blog : Drawing from Line to Life blog
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